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Chapter 9 Geotourism in the Hawaiian Islands

DOI: 10.23912/978-1-906884-09-3-1087

ISBN: 978-1-906884-09-3

Published: April 2010

Component type: chapter

Published in: Geotourism: the tourism of geology and landscape

Parent DOI: 10.23912/978-1-906884-09-3-21

Abstract

Situated almost in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, the Hawaiian Islands are not only one of the most isolated places in the world (Juvic and Juvic, 1998), but also one of one of the most isolated places in the world (Juvic and Juvic, 1998), but also one of the best known. Hawaii's acclaimed natural attractions stem from its volcanic origins - tall mountains deeply eroded by tropical rains and waterfalls into rugged gorges and valleys, a spectacular backdrop for world-class beaches, dramatic volcanic landscapes and forests. The state consists of six main islands: Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Maui, Lanai and Hawaii Island, also known as the Big Island. Two lesser known islands, Niihau and Kahoolawe, are not open to conventional tourism. Tens of smaller, much older islands, northwest of the main island chain, are protected by-and-large within the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument.

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Contributors

  • Lisa M. King, James Cook University (Author)

For the source title:

  • David Newsome, Murdoch University (Editor)
  • Ross K. Dowling, Edith Cowan University (Editor)

Cite as

King, 2010

King, L.M. (2010) "Chapter 9 Geotourism in the Hawaiian Islands" In: Newsome, D. & Dowling, R.K. (ed) . Oxford: Goodfellow Publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.23912/978-1-906884-09-3-1087

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Chapter 9 Geotourism in the Hawaiian Islands [Details]Price: £5.99*Licences / Downloadable file

Published in Geotourism: the tourism of geology and landscape

Chapter 9 Geotourism in the Hawaiian Islands [Details]Price: £5.99*Licences / Downloadable file
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