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Chapter 1 Introduction

DOI: 10.23912/9781911396673-4119

ISBN: 9781911396673

Published: July 2019

Component type: chapter

Published in: Reputation and Image Recovery for the Tourism Industry

Parent DOI: 10.23912/9781911396673-3803

Abstract

Tourism has always been impacted by crises and disasters, and no tourism destination is exempt (Beirman, 2006). Tourism is particularly susceptible to natural disasters (hurricanes, earthquakes and bushfires amongst others), which can cause sudden and immediate damage and destruction to destinations and their infrastructure, as well as longer terms issues with reduced visitor arrivals, leading to knock-on employment problems (Huang et al., 2008). However, there are other types of man-made crises that can also affect the tourism industry, including the actual or perceived threat of terrorism or political instability within a destination. Additionally, while some crises may affect entire destinations, others are more specific, affecting only particular industry sectors or organisations. Finally, not all challenges for destination marketers arise suddenly. Many destinations struggle to attract tourists because they are perceived to be unattractive for some reason, perhaps as a result of the long-running presence of heavy industry. The common thread linking these various crises, disasters and challenges is the unfortunate effect that they have on the reputation and image of the destination or organisation involved. Faulkner (2001: 136) defined a disaster as “a situation where an enterprise or a destination is confronted with sudden unpredictable catastrophic changes over which it has little control”. A crisis, on the other hand, is considered to be “a situation where the root cause of an event is, to some extent, self-inflicted through such problems as inept management structures and practices or a failure to adapt to change” (Faulkner 2001, p.136).
However, while there is an academic distinction between the term ‘crisis’ and ‘disaster’, they are often used interchangeably and in this book, both terms will be used.

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Contributors

  • Judith Mair, Associate Professor, UQ Business School, University of Queensland, Australia (Author)
  • Gabby Walters, Tourism Discipline, School of Business, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD (Author)

For the source title:

  • Gabby Walters, Tourism Discipline, School of Business, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD (Editor)
  • Judith Mair, Associate Professor, UQ Business School, University of Queensland, Australia (Editor)

Cite as

Mair & Walters, 2019

Mair, J. & Walters, G. (2019) "Chapter 1 Introduction" In: Walters, G. & Mair, J. (ed) . Oxford: Goodfellow Publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.23912/9781911396673-4119

References

Beirman, D. (2006). Best Education Network Think Tank V keynote address: “Marketing Tourism Destinations from Crisis to Recovery.” Tourism Review International, 10, 7–16.

https://doi.org/10.3727/154427206779307259

Faulkner, B. (2001). Towards a framework for tourism disaster management. Tourism Management, 22(2),135–147.

https://doi.org/10.1016/s0261-5177(00)00048-0

Fink, S. (1986). Crisis Management. New York: American Association of Management.

Huang, Y.-C., Tseng, Y.-P. & Petrick, J. F. (2008). Crisis management planning to restore tourism after disasters: A case study from Taiwan. Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing, 23(2), 203–221.

https://doi.org/10.1300/j073v23n02_16

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Published in Reputation and Image Recovery for the Tourism Industry

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